biotin

How Biotin boosts hair growth

Article written by Healthline.com

Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that’s a part of the vitamin B family. It’s also known as vitamin H. Your body needs biotin to help convert certain nutrients into energy. It also plays an important role in the health of your hair, skin, and nails.

If you aren’t getting enough biotin, you may experience hair loss or a scaly red rash. However, a deficiency is rare. In most cases, the biotin you get from your diet is enough for you to reap the health benefits it offers.  Still, many people are increasing their intake in hopes of additional benefits. 

 

What the research says about biotin and hair growth

Keratin is a basic protein that makes up your hair, skin, and nails. It’s clear that biotin improves your body’s keratin infrastructure. But beyond that, researchers aren’t really sure what biotin’s role in hair or skincare is.  Research on the effects of biotin on hair growth is sparse. To date, there’s only limited evidence to suggest that increased biotin intake may help promote hair growth.

 

 

For example, in one 2015 study, women with thinning hair were given an oral marine protein supplement (MPS) containing biotin or a placebo pill twice per day for 90 days. At the beginning and end of the study, digital images were taken of the affected areas on the scalp. Each participant’s hair was also washed and any shed hairs were counted. The researcher found that women who took an MPS experienced a significant amount of hair growth in the areas affected by hair loss. They also had less shedding.

 

 

A 2012 studyTrusted Source by the same researcher produced similar results. Participants perceived improvement in hair growth and quality after 90 and 180 days.

 

Biotin-rich foods to eat

You’re probably already getting the daily recommended amount of biotin from the food you eat. But if you’d like to increase your intake, you can add more biotin-rich foods into your diet.

These include:

  • organ meats, such as liver or kidney
  • egg yolk
  • nuts, such as almonds, peanuts, and walnuts
  • soybeans and other legumes
  • whole grains
  • bananas
  • cauliflower
  • mushrooms

Heat can reduce biotin’s efficacy, so opt for raw or minimally-processed dishes. The amount of biotin can vary from food to food, too, so be sure to read the nutritional information whenever possible. This can help you select items with the most biotin for your buck.

 

Other benefits of biotin

Although more research is needed to assess its effects on hair growth, biotin does have several proven benefits.

For example, biotin is one of several B vitamins that supports a healthy metabolism. Biotin converts glucose from carbohydrates into energy for the body and aids amino acids in carrying out normal bodily functions.

 

Biotin is also thought to:

reduce inflammation

  • improve cognitive function
  • help lower blood sugar in people with diabetes
  • increase “good” HDL cholesterol and decrease “bad” LDL cholesterol

How long until you see results?

Most people won’t see any noticeable benefits until they’ve increased their intake for several months. For best results, you should be consistent in your intake. If you’re increasing your intake through food, you’ll need to eat several biotin-rich foods on a daily basis to actually ingest enough biotin to make a difference. If you’re taking a supplement, it’s important that you take it daily or as directed by your doctor.

 

 

 

Biotin rich Quick Grow products

Quick Grow shampoos and conditioners are rich in Biotin

Did you know our Shampoos and Conditioners contain Biotin,  Horsetail Silica and our Advanced Amino Complex.  


Read more about the powerful benefits of aminos in this article to find out which products in our range you can use to further boost your hair growth performance.

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